“It was a great honour to be the first winner of the Award."
Roy Williams, winner 1997 and 2010
  
  
Supported by the Peggy Ramsay Foundation
Q&A with Archie Maddocks

Q&A with Archie Maddocks

What are the themes of your play?

Belonging, tradition, identity, gentrification and family.

Why did you write it and why now?

I actually wrote it a few years ago and redrafted it this year. I wanted to shine a light on the creeping gentrification taking place across the world and explore whether it’s actually a bad thing or not.  Also, at the time of writing it I was working in a funeral parlour and thought that it would be an ideal setting for a play.

Which playwrights are you influenced by and why?

David Mamet because of the intensity and pacing of his plays.  Edward Albee because the way that he structures plays and uses time has always amazed me.  Roy Williams and Kwame Kwei Armah because, with both of them, it was the first time I saw myself and people I recognise on stage.

What do you want to achieve as a playwright?

Whatever I can really. Having my work put on is always amazing, so if that keeps happening I will be more than happy.